Blog Archives

Pancakes – A Beginner’s Guide

Pancakes with blueberries and chocolate chips cooked into the batter, served with blueberries and drizzled with a generous amount of maple syrup.

Pancakes with blueberries and chocolate chips cooked into the batter, served with blueberries and drizzled with a generous amount of maple syrup.

I’ve been avoiding attempting a Scotch/American pancake recipe for awhile because most pictures always present it as a huge portion that could probably feed a family of 6, and I tend to avoid not only promoting but also eating big portions especially for breakfast, but seeing as pancake day is just around the corner I figured I’d come up with and share my own pancake recipe, albeit with a more reasonable portion size. Now don’t get me wrong, I LOVE pancakes, I just don’t like how you have to make so many at once!

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Kakaós Csiga (Cocoa Rolls)

Flaky cocoa-filled pastries.

(Pronunciation: “Kah-kah-osh Chee-gaw”)

Although the translation for this is actually “cocoa snails”, I figured since some people aren’t a fan of escargot I’d put “cocoa rolls” in the title instead.

Jokes aside, these baked sweets are common in Hungary, similar to cinnamon rolls, but with cocoa powder instead of cinnamon. Cocoa rolls are generally larger than cinnamon rolls since the dough is rolled out much more thinly which makes space for more filling. These also don’t include that deliciously rich cream cheese glaze that cinnamon rolls usually come drizzled in… But then again, this is my website, and today we’re doing cocoa rolls! \(^O^)/

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Scallop Linguine with Wine Sauce – A Beginner’s Guide to Sauce Making

Pan-seared scallops served with linguine pasta in wine sauce.

So I was in the kitchen experimenting again, just like when I came up with that Garlic Shrimp Spaghetti à la Béchamel dish. Although this time instead of testing the efficacy of almond milk in a béchamel sauce, my goal was to 1. Learn how to cook scallops and 2. Practice making sauces, in general.

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Rice Pudding

Creamy breakfast style rice pudding topped with cinnamon.

Creamy breakfast style rice pudding topped with cinnamon.

 

Tejberizs… milchreis… Arroz con leche… Riz au lait… Rice pudding…?

In case you didn’t catch that; pretty much every language names this dish “Rice & Milk”, or something along those lines, except English, where for some reason it’s a pudding. I guess that’s because pudding is not really considered breakfast food in the western world, but dessert rather. However in many European countries, what English calls “rice pudding” is actually a porridge/cereal-like dish, served warm and is very commonly eaten for breakfast, especially by children. I know I used to eat it a lot when I was baby. (´・ω・`)

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Semolina Porridge (Cream of Wheat) – A Beginner’s Guide

Tejbegríz, semolina porridge, semolina pudding, Grießkoch, Grießbrei, griesmeelpap, mannagrynsgröt, and sometimes “Cream of Wheat”, this is a porridge dish commonly eaten for breakfast in Europe, especially by children, and sometimes as a dessert in both Europe and outside of Europe.

All these different names and regional variations are confusing… I actually used to think this was a Hungarian dish because my mother used to make it for me for breakfast when I was a kid, and so I grew up thinking it came from Hungary because it was called tejbegríz and we never called it anything else. Turns out it’s a type of porridge; very similar to grits or polenta, except it uses semolina instead of cornmeal. In fact, outside of the US, grits is referred to as semolina with no distinction between the type of grain unless explicitly specified. This is way too confusing and so I’ll stop talking about it. Let’s keep things simple… A rose by any other name, this dish is made from semolina; the coarse, purified wheat middlings of durum wheat used to make Italian pasta, commonly enriched and packaged as a hot breakfast cereal in North America under the name “Cream of Wheat”. (´・ω・`)

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Sólet (Cholent)

Bean stew topped with smoked duck breast, beef, and a halved egg.

Bean stew topped with smoked duck breast, beef, and a halved egg.

(Pronunciation: “Sho-let”)

Sólet, which apparently is the father of cholent, is a Jewish-Hungarian dish usually prepared on Friday nights before the sabbath, simmered overnight, and then eaten the next day for lunch. This was done to conform to Jewish laws that prohibit cooking on the sabbath. Now I’m not Jewish, but this was something I was pretty curious about because it involved cooking on very low heat in an oven for a long period of time, something I haven’t really done before.

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Jókai Bableves (Bean Soup with Smoked Ham Hock)

Bean soup with smoked ham hock, smoked sausage, egg noodles, carrots, topped with some sour cream.

Bean soup with smoked ham hock, smoked sausage, egg noodles, carrots, topped with some sour cream.

(Pronunciation: “Yo-kaw-ee Bob-leh-vesh”)

Well actually the translation for Jókai bableves is “Jókai’s bean soup” as it was named after Jókai Mór, a Hungarian writer whose favourite soup included beans, egg noodles, smoked ham hock and smoked sausage, and topped off with a heaping spoonful of sour cream. Whoever this guy was, he certainly had good taste. This dish can also be called “csülkös bableves” which literally means ham hock bean soup.

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Kókuszgolyó (Coconut Rum Balls)

Chocolate cherry-filled rum balls rolled in shredded coconut.

(Pronunciation: “Koh-koos Go-yo”)

Coconut rum balls; a popular treat commonly given away in Hungary during the holidays!

While coconut rum balls aren’t necessarily Hungarian, they are the most popular type of rum ball in Hungary so they qualify as something I could add to the Hungarian section of my cookbook which I think is starting to hold me back culinary-wise because Hungarians are basically wannabe French cooks. I suppose that applies to me as well…? ;-;

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Food Talk – Dishes for the Post-Holiday Dieter

If you’re like me and you ate like a pig this season, then this post is for you! Here’s basically all the recipes I’ve come up with for the last 4 days, keeping into consideration that while on a diet, only “substantial low-calorie foods” should be consumed. Hey, I’m not just a cook, I’m also a nutritionist, which means absolutely nothing! If I were a dietitian though…

Anyways, I don’t know who came up with the whole “NO LESS THAN 1200 CALORIES A DAY” bullshit. I’ve been eating around 300-600 for the last 4 days and I feel fine. And thus, all my meals have been around 100-200 calories each and made as nutrient-dense as possible. The trick is to keep it 3 ingredients or less, and enjoy the shit out of every bite…

This was also a great way to test out my new artificial lighting setup… my life is going to be so much less stressful thanks to this thing. ;-;

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Eggnog – Raw vs Cooked

Eggs, milk, cream, sugar, cinnamon, nutmeg, and rum.

Eggs, milk, cream, sugar, cinnamon, nutmeg, and rum.

Alright, eggnog! Let’s do this!!!

So let me start off by saying that I’m not scared of salmonella and I’m perfectly fine with consuming raw eggs. After looking into the history of eggnog a little, I found out that traditionally it is made using raw eggs. Also, look up “raw eggnog” and I guarantee most of the results will be by vegans, many of which who deliberately left out the word “vegan” from the title of the post with the chance that non-vegans may click on it and get tricked into making a vegan eggnog using carrageenan, guar gum, natural and artificial flavorings, spices, monoglycerides, and colorings… Wait sorry, those are actually the ingredients found in store-bought eggnog. Raw vegan eggnog is actually pretty good stuff, however, that’s not what I do here. I’m a traditionalist, so if you’re vegan, look for an eggnog recipe elsewhere. And most importantly, regardless of your dietary preferences, don’t buy eggnog from the store, please. Make it yourself, it takes literally 5 minutes and tastes that much better. (´・ω・`)

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