Blog Archives

Kakaós Csiga (Cocoa Rolls)

Flaky cocoa-filled pastries.

(Pronunciation: “Kah-kah-osh Chee-gaw”)

Although the translation for this is actually “cocoa snails”, I figured since some people aren’t a fan of escargot I’d put “cocoa rolls” in the title instead.

Jokes aside, these baked sweets are common in Hungary, similar to cinnamon rolls, but with cocoa powder instead of cinnamon. Cocoa rolls are generally larger than cinnamon rolls since the dough is rolled out much more thinly which makes space for more filling. These also don’t include that deliciously rich cream cheese glaze that cinnamon rolls usually come drizzled in… But then again, this is my website, and today we’re doing cocoa rolls! \(^O^)/

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Sólet (Cholent)

Bean stew topped with smoked duck breast, beef, and a halved egg.

Bean stew topped with smoked duck breast, beef, and a halved egg.

(Pronunciation: “Sho-let”)

Sólet, which apparently is the father of cholent, is a Jewish-Hungarian dish usually prepared on Friday nights before the sabbath, simmered overnight, and then eaten the next day for lunch. This was done to conform to Jewish laws that prohibit cooking on the sabbath. Now I’m not Jewish, but this was something I was pretty curious about because it involved cooking on very low heat in an oven for a long period of time, something I haven’t really done before.

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Jókai Bableves (Bean Soup with Smoked Ham Hock)

Bean soup with smoked ham hock, smoked sausage, egg noodles, carrots, topped with some sour cream.

Bean soup with smoked ham hock, smoked sausage, egg noodles, carrots, topped with some sour cream.

(Pronunciation: “Yo-kaw-ee Bob-leh-vesh”)

Well actually the translation for Jókai bableves is “Jókai’s bean soup” as it was named after Jókai Mór, a Hungarian writer whose favourite soup included beans, egg noodles, smoked ham hock and smoked sausage, and topped off with a heaping spoonful of sour cream. Whoever this guy was, he certainly had good taste. This dish can also be called “csülkös bableves” which literally means ham hock bean soup.

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Kókuszgolyó (Coconut Rum Balls)

Chocolate cherry-filled rum balls rolled in shredded coconut.

(Pronunciation: “Koh-koos Go-yo”)

Coconut rum balls; a popular treat commonly given away in Hungary during the holidays!

While coconut rum balls aren’t necessarily Hungarian, they are the most popular type of rum ball in Hungary so they qualify as something I could add to the Hungarian section of my cookbook which I think is starting to hold me back culinary-wise because Hungarians are basically wannabe French cooks. I suppose that applies to me as well…? ;-;

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Csirkepaprikás (Chicken Paprikash)

Chicken served with nokedli and a sour cream sauce.

Chicken served with nokedli and a sour cream sauce.

(Pronunciation: “Cheer-keh Paw-pree-cash”)

I have a feeling somebody out there was waiting for this one. “Hey, this guy does Hungarian recipes! Where’s the friggen’ chicken puh-pree-kash?!!!”

Well sir, here it is. Delayed because I like coming up with the best recipes ever before releasing them, and to be honest, this did take me awhile to make exceptionally tasty… I’ve tried several other people’s recipes, most of which were simply waaaay too bland for my tastes. And while drumsticks may look the best presentation-wise, they simply aren’t meaty enough.

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Meggyes-Mákos Rétes (Sour Cherry & Poppy Seed Strudel)

A puff pastry strudel filled with sour cherries and poppy seeds.

(Pronunciation: “Meh-dyesh Mah-kosh Rey-tesh”)

Remember when I said that the cottage cheese strudel was the easiest strudel ever? I lied. This is basically as easy as it gets… I was actually surprised myself at how little I needed to add to the filling to make it taste as amazing as it did! It’s also probably going to be the last strudel recipe I’ll be posting. Probably. We’ll see. It’s just that strudels are too easy. (´・ω・`)

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Meggyleves (Sour Cherry Soup)

Sweet sour cherry soup.

(Pronunciation: “Medj Leh-vesh”)

A very light but sweet fruit soup, common in Hungary, usually served chilled as an appetizer or a quick dessert especially during the summer when fresh sour cherries are abound~! As such, it is “customary that the soup contain fresh sour cherries” according to Wikipedia… but if you live outside of Europe and/or simply don’t have access to fresh sour cherries, you can use canned or frozen sour cherries for this, no problem. (´・ω・`) (You can also use normal cherries, but then it wouldn’t be meggyleves, it’d be cseresznyeleves…)

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Krumplifőzelék (Potato Stew)

(Pronunciation: “Kroom-plee Feu-zeh-lake”)

Ah yes, potato stew… the first of– okay wait.

Potato stew served with Hungarian meatballs.

That’s better.

Ah yes, potato stew… the first variety of főzelék (which means vegetable stew) that I wish to share with you. (´・ω・`)

As you can see, we are serving it with meatballs in order to create the dish “Krumplifőzelék Fasírttal”, which means potato stew with meatba– I feel so long-winded sometimes… let’s just get to the point.

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Fasírt (Meatballs)

Hungarian meatballs!

(Pronunciation: “Faw-Sheert”)

Fasírt! The Hungarian meatball! It doubles as both a main course and as a side for főzelék (vegetable stew), particularly krumplifőzelék (the vegetable stew of potato variety). It can also be served alongside rice, sautéed vegetables, lecsó, mashed potatoes, or pretty much anything you’d serve with schnitzel, as they’re pretty similar. (´・ω・`)

What separates this from other meatballs is the fact that… uh, I actually don’t know. But they’re tasty and that’s all I care about! ⊂((・▽・))⊃

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Székelykáposzta (Pork & Sauerkraut Stew)

Transylvanian pork & sauerkraut stew topped with a hefty spoonful of sour cream.

Transylvanian pork & sauerkraut stew topped with a hefty spoonful of sour cream.

(Pronunciation: Sey-keiy-ka-pos-tah)

Yes, sauerkraut stew… with pork meat.

Sometimes called “székelygulyás” (Transylvanian Goulash), this is a bit of an unusual Hungarian dish; a type of pork pörkölt with some recipes even calling for kolbász. What separates it from the usual pörkölt is not the type of meat, however, it’s that fact that a shit-ton of sauerkraut is being thrown in, and that this is generally served as is without an accompanying starch. Although many Hungarians would eat this at home with a nice thick slice of white bread, it’s not part of the recipe. However, we will be stirring in a bit of sour cream to give it some body, then top it off with more sour cream to serve. (´・ω・`)

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